Port Charlotte 2007 (60.4%, ADoS, 2018)

Port Charlotte 2007 (60.4%, ADoS, 2018)

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What happens if you put together a wine cask maturation (here we go again) and a monstrously peated malt? Seeing that that’s a recent trend among some bottlers, I decided to explore it by immersing myself in a small tour de force of some whiskies displaying this peat and wine combo. In this article I’ll put on my explorer’s hat and will tell you about a Port Charlotte (2007-2018) matured in a matured in a cask that contained a red wine from the Vosne-Romanée region for over 10 years. It was bottled by Marco Bonn, the commander in chief of the German whisky shop Brühler Whiskyhaus.

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Highland Park 1999: 4.222 – Ginger and honey sweet tea (56.2%, SMWS, 2016)

Highland Park 1999: 4.222 – Ginger and honey sweet tea (56.2%, SMWS, 2016)

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I recently found this little cave/restaurant/bar a few hundred meters from my apartment here in Paris. I also discovered that you can taste some true little gems in there , like this Highland Park 1999, bottled in 2016 by the Scotch Malt Whisky Society. Aged for more than 16 years in a first fill ex-bourbon barrel, in the glass it’s like it speaks to all my senses saying… drink me! My only regret is that I’m moving out of Paris in a few months and that I didn’t find this place sooner!

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Longrow 1998 (55.7%, CA, 2010)

Longrow 1998 (55.7%, CA, 2010)

I wrote this mini-review during my last vacation, when I visited my family and hiked with my father in the Salbertrand forest, on the Italian Alps. After the short (but very nice) I enjoyed the pause and the view by trying a great Longrow 1998 – 2010, bottled by Cadenhead’s after maturing for 12 years in a rum cask (whaaaat??). I originally posted this review on my Instagram account, but I definitely cannot neglect the blog! Therefore here it is, a great whisky to match the great view, described by my not so great tasting notes.

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Kilchoman 100% Islay: 2015 vs 2018

Kilchoman 100% Islay: 2015 vs 2018

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Kilchoman is Islay’s small “farm distillery”, and as such it pays a great deal of attention to the ingredients, in particular to the barley used in whisky production. One of the most successful products from this distillery is the Kilchoman 100% Islay: as the name says, this one is produced with barley exclusively grown on the island of Islay. Moreover, the Kilcho-men completed every step of whisky-making at the distillery, from the malting to the bottling. It’s a nice concept, and it is meanwhile a pretty established annual release in the nice Kilchoman range, as the first one came out already in 2011. I am always curious on how editions evolve and on how whiskies compare to each other, so today I decided to stare at a fight between two versions, and will share with you my thoughts while the samples of the 5th and the 8th releases will punch each other in the malts.

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Sensology Tasting with The Glenlivet

Sensology Tasting with The Glenlivet

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Thanks to Joules, the brand ambassador for The Glenlivet here in France, I was invited to an interesting experience with some other local whisky enthusiasts. Joules organised in a nearby wine shop (À l’Ombre d’un Bouchon) a “Sensology” tasting: it consists of a pairing of whiskies with ingredients delivering the smells and flavours you can find in the water of life. The whole point is that we are usually deceived by our eyes, our knowledge, our expectations. Therefore, in order to fully experience these malts from The Glenlivet without such distractions, we taste the whiskies in opaque glasses, and without knowing anything about the age or the maturation of the liquid inside them. We have access, as I said, to a pletora of fruits (dried and fresh) and spices and ingredients to help us in identifying the tasting notes.

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